Fall is here, which means winter is just around the corner, and it is a good time to start preparing for the potentially frigid weather.

According to the Farmers Almanac, Texas is expected to be ‘chilled to the bone’ come January.

The last thing anyone in Texas wants is a repeat of last winter. Winter storm Uri was absolutely brutal with record-breaking low temperatures and horribly icy conditions. Not only could our power grid not handle the cold, but many Texas homes weren’t built to withstand such harsh cold.

The combination of no power, poor insulation, and freezing temperatures lead to at least 210 Texas deaths. Most of those were from hypothermia, but some were caused by car accidents, fires, carbon monoxide poisoning, and more.

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It is predicted that the Southern Great Plains, including Oklahoma and Texas, will be experiencing similarly frigid weather in late January, but they are hoping it won’t be as intense.

Knowing that there is a chance for another harsh winter, it is important to be ready. You can never prepare too early, so I highly suggest getting started now to ensure you are ready for whatever this winter may bring.

There are some great resources that offer guidance on how to prepare for a winter storm. Some of the most important points are: ready your home with proper insulation, have a carbon monoxide detector, and gather supplies you would need if you are stuck in your home for several days.

Some supplies that are highly recommended are canned and non-perishable food, water, rock salt (to melt ice), blankets, a radio, flashlights, and fire fuel (like dry wood) to keep a fireplace or wood-burning stove going.

Hopefully, we won't need to worry about needing any sort of emergency kit, but it is always good to be prepared.

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