Here is your Morning Brief for the morning of July 7, 2014. Give me your feedback below and tune in to The Chad Hasty Show for these and many more topics from 8:30 to 11am. Remember, you can listen online at KFYO.com or on your iPhone/Android with the radioPup App.

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Perry Warned Obama

According to the Washington Times, Texas Governor Rick Perry warned the Obama administration for years about the flood of children coming across the border.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry said Sunday he warned the administration for years about the incoming tide of young illegal immigrants and begged for additional resources to deal with it, only to be rebuffed and left with a crisis along his state’s southern border.

“Messages have been sent now for multiple years,” he told ABC’s “This Week” program.

Mr. Perry, a Republican, said he warned about the influx of unaccompanied youths in a letter to the administration in 2012. In 2010, he said he asked for a thousand National Guard troops to protect the border while they trained up to 3,000 Border Patrol agents to augment security there.

The situation at the Mexican border has reached a fevered pitch in recent weeks, as the U.S. government scrambles to process and deal with children who left their families in Mexico or Central America in search of better conditions in the United States.

Although Mr. Obama is telling immigrants not to come to the U.S. illegally, the governor said it is too little, too late.

“The president has sent powerful messages time after time by his policies, by nuances, that it is OK to come to the United States and you can come across and you’ll be accepted in open arms,” Mr. Perry told ABC.

Dreamer Data Won't Help Crisis on Border

One of the main reasons why so many children are coming across the Texas/Mexico border is because many believe they will not be deported if they are kids. For the most part, they are correct and government data according to the LA Times will not dispel those thoughts.

President Obama and his aides have repeatedly sought to dispel the rumors driving thousands of children and teens from Central America to cross the U.S. border each month with the expectation they will be given a permiso and allowed to stay.

But under the Obama administration, those reports have proved increasingly true.

The number of immigrants under 18 who were deported or turned away at ports of entry fell from 8,143 in 2008, the last year of the George W. Bush administration, to 1,669 last year, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement data released under a Freedom of Information Act request.

Similarly, about 600 minors were ordered deported each year from nonborder states a decade ago. Ninety-five were deported last year, records show, even as a flood of unaccompanied minors from Central America — five times more than two years earlier — began pouring across the Southwest border.

The previously unavailable deportation data are likely to fuel the political debate over whether Obama administration policies are partly responsible for the 52,000 children and teens who have surrendered to or been caught by Border Patrol agents since last October, spurring fresh concerns about U.S. border security and immigration law.

Most of the minors are being held in Border Patrol stations in Texas and Arizona, and in emergency facilities set up by the Department of Health and Human Services on military bases and other sites. About 11,000, however, were from Mexico and were swiftly bused back across the border, as the law allows.

Obama administration officials deny that lenient policies — including a 2012 program that allowed immigrants who had entered the country illegally as minors before June 2007 to apply for deportation deferrals — have encouraged the sudden surge.

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These and many more topics coming up on today’s edition of The Chad Hasty Show. Tune in mornings 8:30-11am on News/Talk 790 KFYO, streaming online at kfyo.com, and now on your iPhone and Android device with the radioPup App. All guest interviews can be heard online in our podcast section after the show at kfyo.com.