I recently moved into a new neighborhood and decided to feel more connected by seeing the everyday trials and tribulations of my fellow Hub Citizens. In that vein, I've recently joined Nextdoor. It’s a goldmine of information, and a peek into the absurdly bizarre in our midst.

Of course, there are plenty of posts about lost kittens and offerings of yard work and babysitting services that every neighborhood seems to offer. However, one post on Nextdoor really stood out as a potentially dangerous situation in our village.

Apparently, a pack of Rottweilers decided to invading a Lubbock home and would not allow a resident to leave their abode.

That’s what one Nextdoor user was dealing with. Let's take a look at these vicious, snarling beasts.

Screenshot: Nextdoor

I'm terrified!

Maybe it’s just me, but these just look like some cutie poochies who are just lounging on the porch, enjoying some shade. Sure, it’s an annoyance to have them there, but they certainly didn't look all that aggressive in the photo. Although, yes, I can understand the fear of large or strange dogs. I just…don’t see it here.

I've owned large dogs in the past, including a dopey Doberman who was the most lovable thing you've ever seen. So am I missing something?

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The original poster did edit their comments saying that Lubbock Animal Services had been out to take care of the dogs, and in the comments mentioned that when they arrived, the dogs seemed friendly and cooperative with the dog handler.

So, was it worth going all “Canine Karen” on Nextdoor about these porch puppies? Dunno. Let’s hope that when they were picked up that someone was able to claim these dogs as their own quickly, or that they were re-homed to a family that will love them and appreciate them.

They are cute, though.

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