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This story is not for the faint of heart.

Imagine sleeping blissfully when you notice a leak coming from the ceiling fan above your bed. You fear the worst, that a water pipe or your roof may be leaking. You turn on the bedroom light, and any worst fear you may have had is magnified tenfold when you discover that it's not water leaking onto your bed, but blood.

And not only is blood dripping from the spinning ceiling fan, but it's sprayed all over the walls of your bedroom. That is the nightmare that one Texas woman recently experienced.

According to a story reported by KTSM-9, Ana Cardenas of El Paso was sleeping when she felt drops on her face around 4 a.m. She turned on her light and quickly discovered that her face was covered in blood.

Ms. Cardenas called 911, and it was discovered hat the blood had come from a man between the ages of 55 and 70 who had lived upstairs and died of apparent natural causes. He died directly above the ceiling fan that sprayed the blood all over the room and Ms. Cardenas. The body had been decomposing for several days. When the fan was removed, blood "poured" from the ceiling.

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Ms. Cardenas told KTSM that the apartment complex is so far refusing to pay for the damage to her personal effects and for her inconvenience, stating that insurance "would not pay for it." Representatives for the apartment complex have not been available for comment on the matter.

KTSM also reports that a GoFundMe page has been set up to help defray her costs, which has so far raised nearly $10,000.

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