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The Morning-After Pill Being Made Available Over the Counter to Those 15 and Older [POLL]

Justin Sullivan, Getty Images

The FDA will be moving the morning-after pill to an over the counter purchase and instead of having to be 17 years old to buy it without a prescription, girls just have to be 15. The move is an attempt from the government to satisfy a court deadline to lift age restrictions according to FOX News.

Today, Plan B One-Step is sold behind pharmacy counters, and buyers must prove they’re 17 or older to buy it without a prescription. Tuesday’s decision by the Food and Drug Administration lowers the age limit and will allow the pill to sit on drugstore shelves next to spermicides or other women’s health products and condoms — but anyone who wants to buy it must prove their age at the cash register.

Some contraceptive advocates called the move promising.

“This decision is a step in the right direction for increased access to a product that is a safe and effective method of preventing unintended pregnancies,” said Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. “It’s also a decision that moves us closer to these critical availability decisions being based on science, not politics.”

But earlier this month, U.S. District Judge Edward Korman of New York blasted the Obama administration for imposing the age-17 limit, saying it had let election-year politics trump science and was making it hard for women of any age to obtain the emergency contraception in time. He ordered an end to the age restrictions by Monday.

The women’s group that sued over the age limits said Tuesday’s action is not enough, and it will continue the court fight.

Lowering the age limit “may reduce delays for some young women but it does nothing to address the significant barriers that far too many women of all ages will still find if they arrive at the drugstore without identification,” said Nancy Northup, president of the Center for Reproductive Rights.

The FDA said the Plan B One-Step will be packaged with a product code that prompts the cashier to verify a customer’s age. Anyone who can’t provide such proof as a driver’s license, birth certificate or passport wouldn’t be allowed to complete the purchase.

What do you think about this? Are you in favor of lowering the age to 15 without a prescription? Let us know in today’s KFYO Poll of the Day.


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