Future of Texas' Voter ID Law up in the air. The White House says ISIS Fighters are in the United States, and other top stories of the day. Here is your Morning Brief for the morning of September 23, 2014. 

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Voter ID in Court

The fate of the Voter ID Law in Texas went to a federal judge Monday after weeks of testimony. According to the AP, the Justice Department argued that the law was just another example of discrimination.

The fate of Texas' tough voter ID law moved into the hands of a federal judge Monday, following a trial that the U.S. Justice Department said exposed another chapter in the state's troubling history of discrimination in elections.

State attorneys defending the law signed by Republican Gov. Rick Perry in 2011 urged the judge to follow other courts by upholding photo identification requirements. The most recent such case came this month when a federal appeals panel reinstated Wisconsin's law in time for Election Day.

Whether Texas will also get a ruling before then is unclear. U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos ended the two-week trial in Corpus Christi without signaling when she'll make a decision, meaning that as of now, an estimated 13.6 million registered Texas voters will need a photo ID to cast a ballot in November.

The U.S. Justice Department, which is fighting the law, began closing arguments by flashing onto a projection screen how many eligible voters it says lack an acceptable form of ID: 608,470, a revised lower number than what the DOJ and other law opponents said when the trial began. It also argued that black residents in Texas are four times as likely not to have an ID as white residents, with Hispanics being three times as likely not to have an ID. Both minority groups are traditionally Democratic voters.

"It imposes punishing costs. The burden is far beyond what is usual to vote, and under the circumstances, unsupportable," said Richard Dellheim, a Justice Department attorney.

You have to have an ID to do the following: Drive a car, purchase alcohol, purchase lottery tickets, receive welfare benefits, board a plane, open a checking account, get money out of said account, etc.

But showing an ID to vote on state leaders is somehow racist? Give me a break.

You can read the entire article by clicking on the link above.

ISIS Fights in the United States

The Washington Times reported yesterday that ISIS fighters are in the United States.

White House officials said Monday that some Americans who have fought alongside the Islamic State terrorist group in Syria and Iraq have returned to the United States.

“It includes those who’ve gone, those who’ve tried to go, some who’ve come back and are under active — the FBI is looking at them,” a senior White House official told reporters.

It was the first time U.S. officials confirmed that at least some Americans fighting alongside the Islamist extremist group have returned to the U.S. It’s believed that at least 100 Americans have gone to the Middle East to join the terrorist group.

President Obama has said U.S. intelligence agencies have not yet detected any specific plots by the Islamic State to attack targets in the U.S.

Why would we even allow these people back into the country? They should have been arrested the moment they stepped foot on U.S. soil. Those who chose to fight with and for ISIS should be treated and considered an enemy combatant.

You can read the full story by clicking on the link above.

Other Must Read Links:

The United States Bombs Syria

Cornyn vs. Cruz... Again

Best Place to Live? It's In Texas

Republicans Moving to the Center 

White House to Start Locking the Door 

Rand Paul Blasts Obama and Clinton, Calls for GOP Diversity

Tax Refunds Will Be Cut for Obamacare Recipients 

These and many more topics coming up on today’s edition of The Chad Hasty Show. Tune in mornings 8:30-11am on News/Talk 790 KFYO, streaming online at kfyo.com, and now on your iPhone and Android device with the radioPup App. All guest interviews can be heard online in our podcast section after the show at kfyo.com.