Here is your Morning Brief for May 12, 2015.

Chad Hasty, KFYO.com

Pastor Protection Act

The Texas Senate passed a new piece of legislation on Monday that clarifies, or reinforces to the public that clergy members can refuse to marry same-sex couples. According to the Texas Tribune, many Senate Democrats voted against the common sense legislation.

After a brief debate in which several Democrats questioned the necessity of the measure, lawmakers approved Senate Bill 2065 along nearly party lines with a 21-10 vote. State Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr., D-Brownsville, sided with the chamber's 20 Republicans. Final passage is expected Tuesday.

State Sen. José Rodríguez, an El Paso Democrat who voted against the measure, questioned whether it could be used to justify a refusal to perform interracial marriages — shielding religious officials from prosecution "no matter how extreme [their] views are."

Pointing out that same-sex marriage is banned in Texas, state Sen. John Whitmire, D-Houston, asked what problem the bill was trying to fix.

Whitmire said it was "unheard of" that a same-sex couple would try to force a pastor to perform a wedding ceremony if that pastor did not accept their marriage.

"They just want to be left alone to love their partner, they want to get married with clergy in a setting that embraces that union," he said.

Whitmire can't be that naive. I'm sure about ten years ago there were people saying that bakers would never be forced to bake a cake for a gay wedding, but guess what? It happens. I don't blame Republicans for passing this legislation. We all know where some on the left want to take this issue.

I believe that there are some on the left who will encourage lawsuits against Pastors and religious buildings (church, temple, etc.) when it comes to gay weddings. Sadly, we have to have protections in place for the religious community. I believe that 98% of the gay community just wants to fall in love and be left alone. It's the 2% that should concern everyone as they are just looking to be offended and looking to sue.

Islamic Threat in West Texas?

KFYO's Rob Snyder posted a story yesterday about some graffiti found in Scurry County at a rest stop. Scurry County is located roughly 90 miles away from Lubbock but the graffiti makes reference to the Hub City.

The photographs were sent to Hannity.com by a Hannity Radio Show listener. The graffiti reads: “Allah Akbar, LBK TX.” Also included in the graffiti is an image that appears to be a drawing of a bomb. “LBK” is an unofficial abbreviation for Lubbock.

Texas DPS Spokesman Tom Vinger told Hannity.com that the DPS does not have any updateson the graffiti and that it’s “too early to draw conclusions.”

Authorities do not know when the graffiti was painted, nor if it was before or after May 3′s terrorist attack in Garland. Two men were killed by police in Garland while they “attempted to wage jihad” on a Prophet Muhammad cartoon-drawing contest they saw as offensive to Muslims.

Is the graffiti a real threat or just graffiti from kids who wanted attention? No one knows. Some out there believe that Lubbock would be the last place in Texas for Islamic terror, but it wouldn't be smart to think that way. Texas Tech is a major university with students from all over the world. Plus, who would have thought Garland, TX would have been singled out by terrorist?

At the end of the day, a lone wolf attack in any city on any day is possible. Whether it is here in Lubbock, or in New York City, we should all be aware of our surroundings.

Other Must Read Links:

Cruz and Perry Shine in South Carolina

Perry Enjoys a Warm Welcome

DMN Editorial: It’s Time to Place Confederate Statues in Context

Bill Maher: Stop the Excuses for Muslims Who Want to Live in the 7th Century

Porn and Video Game Addiction Leading to Masculinity Crisis?

These and many more topics coming up on today’s edition of The Chad Hasty Show. Tune in mornings 8:30-11am on News/Talk 790 KFYO, streaming online at kfyo.com, and now on your iPhone and Android device with the radioPup App. All guest interviews can be heard on our KFYO YouTube page after the show and online at kfyo.com.