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Chad’s Morning Brief: American’s Are Less Optimistic, Taping the Police, & More

Here is your Morning Brief for the morning of November 27, 2012. Give us your feedback below and tune in to The Chad Hasty Show for these and many more topics from 8:30 to 11 am.

Chip Somodevilla, Getty Images

1. Optimism Drops (link)

Even though Americans voted to re-elect President Obama, it doesn’t mean they are very hopeful. In fact, CNN says that Americans are less optimistic now than they were four years ago.

A majority of Americans give President Barack Obama a thumbs up on the job he’s doing in office, but according to a new national poll they are less optimistic about the country’s future than they were four years ago when Obama won the White House for the first time.

 

CNN/ORC International survey released Monday indicates that 56% of the public thinks the country will be better off four years from now, with four in ten saying it will be worse than they are now.

 

“The 56% figure’s not bad, but it’s way down from the 76% who felt that way in late 2008 after Barack Obama had won his first presidential bid,” said CNN Polling Director Keating Holland.

 

Forty-three percent say things are going well in the country right now, virtually unchanged from just before the election, with 57% saying things are going badly.

 

The survey also indicates that 54% say they are enthusiastic or optimistic about the president’s second term, with 44% pessimistic or afraid. The 54% figure is a bit less than the 58% who felt that way about President George W. Bush’s second tour of duty in November of 2004.

 

Fifty-two percent approve of the way Obama is handling his job as president, with 43% saying they disapprove. Obama’s approval rating is virtually unchanged from his pre-election approval rating of 51%. And it’s changed little this year: Since February the president’s approval rating ranged between 49% and 52% in CNN polling.

 

“The generation gap that was evident in presidential vote still remains, but the gender gap has vanished, at least temporarily,” Holland said. “President Obama’s approval rating is 58% among younger Americans, but a majority of older Americans disapprove of Obama. But Obama’s approval rating among men and women is exactly the same – 52% among men, 52% among women.”

So the guy Americans aren’t crazy about and don’t believe will be good for them in the future was just re-elected. That’s just great. Be afraid for our country friends. Not because of Obama, but of the people that re-elected him and believe in him. Or, sorta believe in him.

2. Supreme Court Says You Can Record the Police (link)

The Supreme Court yesterday rejected a law in Illinois that would have prohibited people from recording the police. According to ABC News:

The justices on Monday left in place a lower court ruling that found that the state’s anti-eavesdropping law violates free speech rights when used against people who tape law enforcement officers. The law sets out a maximum prison term of 15 years.

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit in 2010 against Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez to block prosecution of ACLU staff for recording police officers performing their duties in public places, one of the group’s long-standing monitoring missions.

Opponents of the law say the right to record police is vital to guard against abuses.

What a terrible law in the first place. Citizens should absolutely be allowed to film police. Go onto YouTube and search for the videos that show police officers abusing their power and even telling people they couldn’t record them.

3. Control of the Internet (link)

How do you feel about the United Nations running something most, if not all, of us use on a daily basis? Next week, the United Nations will seek to control the internet. According to The Weekly Standard:

“Next week the ITU holds a negotiating conference in Dubai, and past months have brought many leaks of proposals for a new treaty. U.S. congressional resolutions and much of the commentary, including in this column, have focused on proposals by authoritarian governments to censor the Internet. Just as objectionable are proposals that ignore how the Internet works, threatening its smooth and open operations,” reports the Wall Street Journal.

“Having the Internet rewired by bureaucrats would be like handing a Stradivarius to a gorilla. The Internet is made up of 40,000 networks that interconnect among 425,000 global routes, cheaply and efficiently delivering messages and other digital content among more than two billion people around the world, with some 500,000 new users a day.

“Proposals for the new ITU treaty run to more than 200 pages. One idea is to apply the ITU’s long-distance telephone rules to the Internet by creating a ‘sender-party-pays’ rule. International phone calls include a fee from the originating country to the local phone company at the receiving end. Under a sender-pays approach, U.S.-based websites would pay a local network for each visitor from overseas, effectively taxing firms such as Google and Facebook. The idea is technically impractical because unlike phone networks, the Internet doesn’t recognize national borders. But authoritarians are pushing the tax, hoping their citizens will be cut off from U.S. websites that decide foreign visitors are too expensive to serve.”

Arthur Herman explains “The UN’s Internet Grab” here.

And even Google has already come out against the ITU.

“The ITU is the wrong place to make decisions about the future of the Internet,” says Google. “Only governments have a voice at the ITU. This includes governments that do not support a free and open Internet. Engineers, companies, and people that build and use the web have no vote.”

“The ITU is also secretive. The treaty conference and proposals are confidential,” adds Google.

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U.S. To Leave Troops in Afghanistan Past 2014

These and many more topics coming up on today’s edition of The Chad Hasty Show. Tune in mornings 8:30-11am on News/Talk 790 KFYO, streaming online at kfyo.com, and now on your iPhone and Android device with the radioPup App. All guest interviews can be heard online in our podcast section after the show at kfyo.com.

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